7 Easy Tips For Heart Health

7 Easy Tips For Heart Health

Cardiovascular disease is the leading global cause of death, accounting for more than 17.3 million deaths per year. See how colorful fruits & vegetables add a visual appeal to dishes, but also promote heart health and disease prevention.

Here are some tips:

Tip #1: When it comes to preventing or managing conditions like heart disease, how we cook our food matters. Sautéing is a healthy cooking technique that allows you to add vibrantly colored vegetables to your diet in an easy and affordable way.

Tip #2: The best way to add color to your diet is by sneaking vegetables into meals. Cooked and pureed orange vegetables like butternut squash, sweet potatoes and carrots can be blended into dishes like macaroni & cheese to decrease saturated fat and sodium levels.

Tip #3: Snack healthier by swapping overly sweet or salty foods with fruits and vegetables. Try apples and pears, associated with lowering the risk of cardiovascular disease.

Tip #4: Replace meat with vibrant fibrous vegetables. Look for meatless recipes or substitute meat portions from recipes with colorful vegetables. Try chickpeas or zucchini - these are known to boost a healthy heart.

Tip #5: Most of the cholesterol-raising saturated fats that Americans eat come from meat and full-fat dairy products, such as whole milk and cheese. If you decrease your daily intake of animal fat, you’re going to decrease your intake of saturated fat.1

Tip #6: Meatless meals are simply moving vegetables & fruits from side dish to entree. Choose fibrous whole grains, beans and legumes, unsalted nuts, and lower fat and fat-free dairy foods.2

Tip #7: Get started eating one meatless meal a week. Stick with it to feel lighter and your wallet fatter. Your heart will thank you, too!3


 


SOURCES:
1 Alice Lichtenstein, D.Sc., a professor of nutrition at Tufts University and an AHA volunteer.
2 Rachel Johnson, Ph.D., and R.D., a nutrition professor at the University of Vermont and vice chair of the American Heart Association’s Nutrition Committee.
3 Rachel Johnson, Ph.D., and R.D., a nutrition professor at the University of Vermont and vice chair of the American Heart Association’s Nutrition Committee.